Saturday, 10 August 2019

M.E. Association Disability Rating Scale // Severe M.E. Awareness Week 2019

Today’s blog post shares the The M.E. Association's Disability Rating Scale as a way of raising awareness of M.E. and how affects individuals so differently.

I think far too often the stereotype of M.E. is either the fatigue aspect of the illness or the severe aspect of M.E. with individuals being bed-bound. Even with severe M.E. you don’t have to be bed-bound. Many are housebound too, or what I term ‘sofa bound’.

Obviously this scale is a generalised overview of the different severities of M.E. and people with M.E. can’t neatly fit into these tick boxes and some/many individuals will go up and down the scale at various points in their life.


I just thought it would be helpful for readers to see and understand.


MILD


0% DISABLED
Fit and well for at least the past three months. No symptoms at rest or after exertion. Capable of full-time employment or education.

10% DISABLED
Generally well with only occasional mild symptoms. No problems with personal care or daily living. Mobility and cognitive functions may still be restricted but almost back to previous levels. May be able to return to full-time work or education.
20% DISABLED
Normally only mild symptoms at rest but exacerbation will follow activity. Able to carry out all aspects of personal care and to plan and prepare meals. Able to walk short to medium distances (i.e. up to half a mile) on a regular basis. Normally able to return to flexible or part-time work or education.

Moderate


30% DISABLED
Fluctuating level of mild to moderate symptoms. Normally able to carry out all aspects of personal care and to plan and prepare meals. Able to walk short distances on a regular basis. May be able to return to work on a flexible or part-time basis – provided adjustments are made to cope with physical activity or cognitive problems. May have to stop leisure or social pursuits to resume work or education.

40% DISABLED
Moderate symptoms for some or much of the time. Normally able to carry out most activities linked to personal care and normal daily living but may require assistance with meal preparation. May be able to cope with some work-related tasks for short periods – provided they are not mentally or physically strenuous – but not able to resume regular work or education.

50% DISABLED
Moderate symptoms for much or all of the time. Symptom exacerbation follows mental or physical exertion. Not usually confined to the house but mobility restricted to walking up to a few hundred yards at best. May require help with some aspects of personal care. May require help with meal planning and preparation. Requires regular rest periods during the day. Able to carry out light activities (i.e. housework, desk work) linked to normal daily living for short periods but not able to resume regular employment or education.

60% DISABLED
Moderate symptoms for much or all of the time. Significant symptom exacerbation follows mental or physical exertion. Not usually confined to the house but has significant restrictions on mobility when outside and may require wheelchair assistance. Likely to require help with aspects of personal care and meal preparation – but not necessarily on a full-time basis. Requires regular rest periods during the day. Unable to resume any meaningful regular employment or education.

Severe


70% DISABLED
Moderate to severe symptoms for most or all of the time. Confined to the house for much or all of the time. Normally requires help with various aspects of personal care and meal planning and preparation, possibly on a 24- hour basis. Very limited mobility. May require wheelchair assistance.

80% DISABLED
Moderate to severe symptoms for most or all of the time. Only able to carry out a very limited range of physical activities relating to personal care without help. Requires help with meal planning and preparation. 
Frequently unable to leave the house and may be confined to a wheelchair when up or spends much of the day in bed. Unable to concentrate for more than short periods of time. Usually requires daytime and night-time supervision.

Very Severe


90% DISABLED
Severe symptoms – often including marked cognitive dysfunction, for much or all of the time. Bedridden and housebound for much or all of the time. Has considerable difficulties with all aspects of personal care. Unable to plan or prepare meals. Requires practical support and supervision on a 24-hour basis.

100% DISABLED
Severe symptoms – often on a continual basis. Cognitive function (i.e. short-term memory, concentration, attention span) is likely to be very poor. Bedridden and incapable of living independently. Requires a great deal of supervision and practical support – including disability aids such as a hoist or a stair lift – with all aspects of personal care (i.e. feeding, dressing, washing) on a 24-hour basis.

Reference

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